Author Topic: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?  (Read 71 times)

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Offline Cariad

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Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« on: October 13, 2017, 12:02:54 PM »
'And many other signs truly did Jesus
in the presence of His disciples,
which are not written in this book:
But these are written,
.. that ye might believe
.... that Jesus is the Christ,
...... the Son of God;
and that believing
.. ye might have life
.... through His Name.'

(John 20:30,31) 

* Why is the word "repent" not used in the book of John?

In John 20:30-31, we are told that this book was written to unbelievers for the purpose of salvation. In many of the other books, we find that they are addressed to saints (saved people). In fact, a good case can be made to prove that John is the only book in the N.T. written to unbelievers. If this is true (and, it is), then every truth necessary for salvation must be found in John (and, it is). Why then, does it not contain the word "repent"?

In the light of it's absence, is this word being misapplied?

In Christ Jesus
Cariad



Offline francis drake

Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2017, 05:03:22 PM »
'And many other signs truly did Jesus
in the presence of His disciples,
which are not written in this book:
But these are written,
.. that ye might believe
.... that Jesus is the Christ,
...... the Son of God;
and that believing
.. ye might have life
.... through His Name.'

(John 20:30,31) 

* Why is the word "repent" not used in the book of John?

In John 20:30-31, we are told that this book was written to unbelievers for the purpose of salvation. In many of the other books, we find that they are addressed to saints (saved people). In fact, a good case can be made to prove that John is the only book in the N.T. written to unbelievers. If this is true (and, it is), then every truth necessary for salvation must be found in John (and, it is). Why then, does it not contain the word "repent"?

In the light of it's absence, is this word being misapplied?

In Christ Jesus
Cariad
Original Word: μετανοέω
Part of Speech: Verb
Transliteration: metanoe?
Phonetic Spelling: (met-an-o-eh'-o)
Short Definition: I repent, change my mind
Definition: I repent, change my mind, change the inner man (particularly with reference to acceptance of the will of God), repent.

I don't really see the lack of the word "repent" as significant. John's gospel still carries the same emphasis but with different words.

None of the other gospels that talks about being "born again" but that doesn't mean they don't espouse new life in Jesus.

Although the word "repent" is missing from John's gospel, all it means is to change your mind. With that understanding, the very essence of being born from above is a recognition of the deadness of all that went before, a process which clearly requires repentance even if the word is not used.
Disturb us Lord, when we are too pleased with ourselves. When our dreams have come true because we dreamed too little. When we arrived safely because we sailed too close to the shore. Disturb us Lord, to dare more boldly. To venture on wider seas. Where storms will show your mastery; Where, losing sight of land, we shall find the stars. We ask you to push back the horizons of our hopes; And to push into the future, in strength, courage, hope and love.                     (SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 1577)

Offline John

Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2017, 07:05:10 AM »
Thank you Francis, for once I had no answer to a question I had not come across.

Offline Cariad

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Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2017, 09:05:04 AM »
'And many other signs truly did Jesus
in the presence of His disciples,
which are not written in this book:
But these are written,
.. that ye might believe
.... that Jesus is the Christ,
...... the Son of God;
and that believing
.. ye might have life
.... through His Name
.
'
(John 20:30,31)
 
@francis drake
@John

Thank you for your responses, though I feel that there is more to be said on this subject.  I agree that the word 'repent' means a change of mind, f.d., but do not believe that it is a requirement for salvation.  The change of mind comes through the operation of the Holy Spirit in heart and mind, as in Romans 12:2.  All that is required for salvation is that we believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and believing we have life through His Name.

In Christ Jesus
Cariad



Offline Deborah

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Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2017, 09:39:19 AM »

Thank you for your responses, though I feel that there is more to be said on this subject.  I agree that the word 'repent' means a change of mind, f.d., but do not believe that it is a requirement for salvation.  The change of mind comes through the operation of the Holy Spirit in heart and mind, as in Romans 12:2.  All that is required for salvation is that we believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and believing we have life through His Name.

In Christ Jesus
Cariad

To believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God is in itself the change of mind, the essence of repentance. Because it requires us to recognise His authority over us and surrender our self-will.
"God has saved us and called us to a holy life - not because of anything we have done but because of His own purpose and grace." (II Timothy 1:9)

Offline Cariad

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Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2017, 09:43:04 AM »
Repentance:-

This word, and the verbal form 'repent' is used to translate two Hebrew words, nacham and its derivatives, and shub; and the Greek words
metamelomai and metanoeo and their derivatives.

Nacham primarily means 'to sigh'. It will therefore cover a gamut of human feelings. It means
(1) to mourn
(2) to grieve
(3) to regret
(4) to be comforted.

The feeling of regret, gives the meaning 'repent'.

Shub means to turn, or return, 'The remnant shall return', and when they do return, they will indeed repent!
Shub is only translated ?repent? three times, namely in 1Kings 8:47; Ezekiel 14:6 and 18:30.

The two Greek words differ in that metamelomai means 'an after care, to regret; to have pain of mind, rather than change of mind;
and change of purpose, rather than change of heart', whereas metanoeo means 'to perceive afterwards, an after mind'. 'This change is always for the better, and denotes a change of moral thought and reflection'

In Christ Jesus
Cariad

Offline Cariad

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Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2017, 09:48:19 AM »
To believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God is in itself the change of mind, the essence of repentance. Because it requires us to recognise His authority over us and surrender our self-will.

Hi, @Deborah

With respect, that is not what is said in John 20:30,31. It says nothing of a change of mind, or a recognition of His authority over us, or of a surrender of our self-will, does it?  Initially what is stated in these verses is all that is required.  It is the Holy Spirit who brings about the change of heart and mind, and recognition of Jesus Christ as Lord and Head,

Thank you.
In Christ Jesus
Cariad

Offline Deborah

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Re: Why is the word, 'repent' not used in the book of John?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2017, 09:49:50 AM »
Meta as a prefix carries the meaning of 'change'. (Metamorphosis is the process by which a caterpillar 'changes form' into a butterfly)

Noia comes from the word nous, which means 'mind'.

Metanoia therefore means (literally) 'a change of mind' - but in our Bibles this is the word normally translated as 'repentance'. Similarly, metanoeo means 'I change my mind' or 'I repent'.

'Repentance' is a rather technical word - a piece of religious jargon. What does it mean in everyday language? Literally, it means to change your mind: to think differently, to change direction, to adopt a different attitude towards God and towards Jesus. It does not mean just feeling sorry because of the consequences of one's behaviour. Nor does it mean (at least, not in the first instance) changing one's behaviour! Of course, genuine repentance often does lead to sorrow over the wrongs that we have done in the past; and any genuine change in attitude will produce a change in behaviour. But we must not make the mistake of putting the cart before the horse! Deeds are the proof of repentance (Luke 3:8; Acts 26:20), not the repentance itself!

When Peter called on the crowd at Pentecost to 'repent' (Acts 2:38), it seems doubtful that he had in mind any specific individual sins (even though they must have committed many and various sins). He was exhorting them to change their attitude towards Jesus - to recognise the One that they had crucified as their Messiah. If they did so, certain consequences would inevitably follow: they would acknowledge Jesus as their Lord, obey His command to be baptised (verse 41), and thereafter put His teaching into practice (as we find them doing in Acts 2:42-47).

This emphasis on inward change is the very essence of Christianity. The Old Covenant failed because it was based on an external law that could deal only with external behaviour (if indeed it was kept at all). But Christians have been "made new in the attitude of our minds" (Ephesians 4:22-24). This means not that we will never sin again, but that we have changed our attitude to sin. Instead of acquiescing in it, or even enjoying it, we fight against it with the help of the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:5; Galatians 5:16,17). We will not always succeed, because we still have a sinful nature; but failure does not mean that our initial repentance was not genuine.
"God has saved us and called us to a holy life - not because of anything we have done but because of His own purpose and grace." (II Timothy 1:9)