Poll

Do you prefer modern or traditional?

Modern. I will buy into the latest thing out.
1 (11.1%)
Traditional. I prefer time served traditional methods.
4 (44.4%)
Not fussy.
4 (44.4%)

Total Members Voted: 7

Author Topic: Modern or traditional.  (Read 414 times)

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Offline John

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2016, 03:09:10 PM »

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


The questions are far to woolly. Traditional or modern what? Cars, holidays, childrens toys, church services, bible translations, hymns or modern worship songs, tools power v manual?

Depending what it is and how its used if its fit for its purpose it doesn't matter whether one uses modern or traditional tools, worship, toys  etc.

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


Offline Mountain Goat

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2016, 11:00:46 PM »
Some modern things are valuable but why have we thrown the engine out with the oil?
We seem to go for broke (In some cases literally) to get things we don't need that get replaced when the next fad comes along.
For example. If one spends a large sum... Lets say ?1000 on an item, one would be dissapointed if it didn't last or become obsolete in 20 years time, yet some computers costing similar prices became obsolete in less then just ten years!
Though traditional items may seem old fashioned, they are reliable and last.
When I started work in the bicycle trade, if a bike didn't have a lifetime warranty on the frame and forks, many bike shops wouldn't stock them. When one manufacturer reduced this to 15 years it caused quite a stir and they lost trade. Today's bikes are less then that. If you don't get a good ten years warranty on frame and forks you are being cheated as it was only a few years back when manufacturers proudly guaranteed their welding for life as long as the bike was not abused and looked after (Not left outside in the rain).

Offline Seeker

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2016, 08:34:44 AM »
Ahhhhhhhh I get what you are getting at a bit more now - I think :undecided:.

Anyways I don't have any flat screen TV's in my house, still on the old big tube ones - well they still work  :D. One did have some problem, but my dad used to repair TV's and deduced it just needed a small part, which luckily I was able to buy, very cheap, a lot cheaper than buying a modern TV.

Computer screen is flat, but only cause the old monitor died, but I am on desktop, not very modern in scheme of things, but I like it :D

Offline Seeker

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2016, 08:39:37 AM »
Hhmmmmmmmm I think I do like some old things, especially if they work. As old saying goes 'why fix it if it's not broken' or summat like that.

I like old books  :D Got some old decorative tins somewhere and other old stuff, they are interesting. It is interesting how wording changes, meanings have changed a bit too, read an old book and even though it is in English the way it is written seems totally different to todays books (does to me anyways).

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2016, 12:44:57 PM »
I don't get on with mobiles, can't stand tiny keys , fingers too big.

Time it takes me to send a text message - I may as well talk to them via landline or the old messenger on the horse.


Offline Mountain Goat

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2016, 10:06:09 PM »
My main touring bike was built in 1989 and I've owned it since new. While I've upgraded it as I go along, it still has a ride superior to many modern bicycles, and qualities that modern bikes lack.
It has a level top tube with geometry that allows you to have an extra "Gear" if up out of the saddle, something lacking with modern geometry. It is made from manganese molybdenum alloy of steel that brings a springy zap to the ride.
Little has changed from pre WW2 days with the exception of a greater gear range and index gear levers, until about the mid 1990's when things started to change. Things became less about what works well and more about what sells well. While there are certainly improvements designed for speed or to tackle seemingly impossible terrain, the traditional tourer; an all round bicycle of quality design; tried and tested and refined over years of traditional perfection was side tracked for bikes designed by computers which never ride the things so though they find the most efficient angles and materials, they do not understand ride quality and feel.
Yes, my bicycle is still made today as the company have come back to their senses and have started to make what us traditionalists want from a bicycle. It is a mix of traditional and modern. Actually I like it, but I prefer my old version and over the years it has undergone many minor changes all designed to make it a more pleasurable ride.

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2016, 01:19:42 AM »
I cannot ride a bike these days - as due the sciatica [years of running up and down ladders]

It would put too much strain on my legs and lower back.[as did ladder work]

But once upon a time I rode a bike]

I lasted about 8 months until one of the tyres got a puncture [after that I was stuck - as no one could help me mend this puncture]

Afer waiting another  2 months / the only thing I could do was to give up on a bike..

Anyway it was a mans bike and I was only 13 years old and I could never reach the ground [in fact it was dangerous - as the brakes did not work properly and I coukd not reach the ground] and it could have cost me my life.










Offline Mountain Goat

Re: Modern or traditional.
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2016, 11:20:46 AM »
That's why one learns to repair things. To get brakes working and fix flat tyres. Only three times in my cycling life I can recall going out and not being able to get home without some outside assistance.
 First was when the rear mech was worn, missed its end screw and became mangled in the spokes of the rear wheel. Another cyclist had the tools for the job and got the mech lose and shortened the chain to allow me to cycle home in a single gear.
 Second was when my freewheeling mechanism of my Shimano 6 speed cassette gave up. Happened on a touring run where I just about reached the furthest point out. I lowered the seat and scooted the bike about four miles, when the rest of the club caught up. I then had assistance from a club member who had a mountain bike (Rare bike back then) and I held his rear carrier to be towed a further four miles. Then I rang my dad to fetch me with his 3 wheeler to get me and the bike home.
Third time was let down with a tube. I had previously fixed a puncture that took the form of a slit. Back then I didn't know one needed to put pin pricks either end of the slit to stop the slit creeping longer. Well, I found out the hard way! Many months later the slit had crept its way beyond the patch on top and I had a sudden puncture. Went to get the tyre off and saw how big the hole was! I can't fix that! Fortunately as I was planning what to do next a lady from a house opposite had seen me and she took me home. Such a blessing.

I've cycled home with injured bikes many times in the past as one can usually get home with care.

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk