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The Idolatry of Youth
« on: October 27, 2014, 01:26:28 PM »

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The Idolatry of Youth

The Idolatry of Youth
In God’s economy, age is an honor.
By Kelli B. Trujillo




In a culture that worships 17-year-old celebrities and upholds teenage bodies as the epitome of womanhood, it’s easy to feel old. By these standards, we’re “old” when we hit 26! We live in a world with multimillion dollar industries built around erasing wrinkles, covering gray, and squeezing in sagging body parts. Age is treated like a disease to be cured, an embarrassing symptom to be suppressed. If the cultural epitome of womanhood is a perfectly toned adolescent body, then we’re all in trouble! After all, our bodies begin their downhill slide into deterioration as early as our 20s.
While there’s certainly no harm in covering our roots or concealing age spots, we must ask ourselves a critical question: Is “young” really what we’re after? Are we buying into a cultural idolatry of short-lived fun, flawlessly smooth skin, and idealized young-adulthood? Or are we yearning for—and called to—something deeper?
I don’t know about you, but I don’t look to teenagers to give me advice about self-worth or calling or grace. I don’t turn to 18-year-olds for insights about marriage and lasting love. I go to heroes who are weather-worn, lifefull, and familiar with the ways of repentance and grace. I turn to the role models who speak from hard-won experience and who’ve hewn wisdom out of decades of prayer and faithfulness. These are the women I want to be like as I grow up.
Are we buying into a cultural idolatry of short-lived fun, flawlessly smooth skin, and idealized young-adulthood? Or are we yearning for—and called to—something deeper?
In God’s economy, age is an honor. From the perspective of faith, “Gray hair is a crown of glory; it is gained by living a godly life” (Proverbs 16:31). As we age, we gain perspective; we grow in self-knowledge; we sharpen our God-awareness; we learn to more readily bend the knee in worship, in repentance, in humility. In this issue of Today’s Christian Woman, we explore the God-shaped process of maturation and we celebrate the goodness of aging.
It’s important to note, of course, that maturation and aging aren’t necessarily the same thing—and this is especially true of spiritual maturation. In “Growing Old with Grace,” Dorothy Greco discusses how one’s commitment to truly follow Jesus makes a profound difference in how we age and the person we become. Will we do life with Jesus and, in our old age, be more like him than we are today? Or will we be shaped over time by self-centeredness and bitterness?

Source: The Idolatry of Youth
http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/groups/faithwall-categories-and-articles/15-general/christian-family/844-the-idolatry-of-youth



C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


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Re: The Idolatry of Youth
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C-Family @ Faithwall

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