Author Topic: The Foundation of Family Planning  (Read 134 times)

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The Foundation of Family Planning
« on: October 19, 2014, 07:33:08 AM »

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The Foundation of Family Planning

The Foundation of Family Planning
A strong marriage and communication are key to deciding your family’s future
By Dr. Juli Slattery




One of the most sensitive issues to navigate in marriage is family planning. It’s wonderful when you and your husband are in perfect agreement about when to start your family and how many children to have. It’s even more amazing when your bodies cooperate with the plans you’ve decided on. In reality, most couples experience a glitch along the way. For example:

He wants to wait a few years until they’ve saved for a down payment on the house, but she hears the biological clock ticking.


After three kids, she wants to even it out with another, but he just wants his wife back.


Four years of “trying” and no baby. Everyone is giving opinions about adoption, in vitro, and fertility medication (especially the in-laws!). The husband and wife are so confused, they feel too paralyzed to do anything.

Situations like these are volatile for a number of reasons.
Family decisions involve deeply held spiritual and ethical convictions about when life begins, what makes a “complete” family, and trusting God for his direction. When couples argue about birth control or having another child, they are tapping into a stream of emotions and beliefs that can be extremely difficult to navigate. Let’s not forget the added stress of overbearing family pressure!
Family decisions involve deeply held spiritual and ethical convictions about when life begins, what makes a “complete” family, and trusting God for his direction.
These decisions also have a profound impact on a couple’s future. Having another child, adopting, or extensive fertility treatment will inevitably influence a family’s schedule, interpersonal dynamic, and bank account. There are a lot of lives to take into account.
Deep Convictions, Difficult Choices
With many life decisions, a husband and wife can compromise. They learn to listen to each other and find some middle ground that meets both of their needs. But this is often impossible with family planning issues. After all, you can’t have half a child or hold to some of your convictions but let go of others. It can feel very much like a stalemate. Because the stakes are so high, resolving the issue superficially can set a couple up for years of resentment.
Evan and Kristin had a blended family with five children, but Kristin wanted a child from their marriage. Evan put his foot down, stating the family was already stretched for time, money, and emotional resources. But Kristin sincerely felt their family just wasn’t complete. After many heated discussions, Evan finally relented and agreed to try for a child together. Kristin was thrilled a few months later to find out they were expecting. When their son was born with Down syndrome, though, Evan and Kristin were crushed. Kristin immediately fell in love with her son, but Evan withdrew.

Source: The Foundation of Family Planning
http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/groups/faithwall-categories-and-articles/15-general/christian-family/569-the-foundation-of-family-planning



C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk