Author Topic: Christian family - family and home topics  (Read 10800 times)

Description: Collecting regular extracts for the Christian Family

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline homebird159

Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #88 on: March 29, 2016, 10:57:50 AM »

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


What a sad, heartfelt, story!

I have friends who reacted similarly when they adopted, and other friends who loved their child to bits, but the child turned on them. 

Even with our own children, they are all different personalities, and sometimes they take us by surprise.  It must be hard when there is not that bonding from birth, and certainly when you have pictured life a certain way and it doesn't turn out that way.

Hats off to those parents who do take on someone else's child, and all the struggles that brings with it.


C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


CFamily

  • Guest
Interview: Why Did Jesus Choose the Cross?
« Reply #89 on: March 30, 2016, 07:21:56 AM »
Interview: Why Did Jesus Choose the Cross?

The Crucifixion has been a problem from the beginning—from devout religionists (Jews and Gentiles) who found the idea of a crucified messiah scandalous, to fans of the late Christopher Hitchens, who said, “I find something repulsive about the idea of vicarious redemption.” Whether it’s the bloody method of death or the theological meaning of the Atonement, even Christians are tempted to give the Crucifixion its due and move briskly to talk about the hope of the Resurrection. It is so much more life affirming!


Not so fast, says Fleming Rutledge. A retired Episcopal priest who spent 22 years in local church ministry, Rutledge is recognized as an outstanding preacher and a teacher of other preachers. She’s also a theologian, as her latest work attests.


The book, The Crucifixion: Understanding the Death of Jesus Christ (Eerdmans), attempts to resurrect (as it were) the centrality and necessity of preaching the Cross. She argues this is especially urgent in an age of unmitigated evils, which she says only the Cross can explain and redeem. She was interviewed by Mark Galli, the editor of Christianity Today.



Why write a book about the Crucifixion today, especially in a time when many prefer to focus on the hope of the Resurrection?


Two reasons. One is that Paul says, “I know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified.” Yet the preaching on Jesus’ death on the cross seems to have been sidelined today. I have been very dismayed by this for decades.


Second, I believe, along with others, that the problem of evil and suffering is the central conundrum of Christian theology. Philip Yancey calls it “the question that will not go away.” We have just lived through a century of genocide. We have entered a new century of terrorism. And to act as though simply talking about resurrection is adequate to the horrors of our time is irresponsible. And it is untrue to what God has revealed in Jesus Christ. I believe that the Crucifixion specifically discloses what God has done and will do about radical evil.


Why is there so little preaching and teaching on the Crucifixion today?


It’s complex, but I identify two reasons. The first is an almost wholesale retreat from the penal substitution theory, which was an unfortunate development in late 18th- and early 19th-century Protestantism. It held the field for a while, especially in evangelical circles. It was overwrought and overly rationalized and taught in a way that sabotaged the unity of the Trinity [as if the Son were placating the wrath of the Father]. It is not in the spirit of the Passion narratives.


Second, people don’t want to hear about sin, suffering, evil, or judgment. The African American church has something to teach us here. They’re not afraid to talk about judgment. People who have suffered under tyrannical, cruel, brutal regimes understand the need for judgment.


American Christianity, as Richard Niebuhr pointed out long ago, has tended to preach a gospel without judgment and a Christ without a cross. This is an old problem. We want to be happy. We want to be positive. We want to overlook the almost unbelievable problems we face today. Yet this is not the case for the poorest of the poor. They know there’s a need for judgment and for a heavenly deliverer.


You downplay penal substitution but not substitutionary atonement altogether. Why?


You’re correct about substitution. I certainly argue that the theme of Jesus substituting himself, the innocent one, for us the guilty must not be allowed to be lost.



Source: Interview: Why Did Jesus Choose the Cross?

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10506-interview-why-did-jesus-choose-the-cross
http://www.amazon.com/The-Crucifixion-Understanding-Death-Christ/dp/0802847323
http://www.christianitytoday.com/images/67724.jpg?h=249&w=230
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

Offline Seeker

Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #90 on: March 30, 2016, 07:00:19 PM »
Yeah, it does seem more overlooked or downplayed now a days. Yes the Love of God is very important and yes I understand people needing to focus on positives - even I try to focus on positives, but not to the extent of denial that there is truly horrific stuff happening in this world. We basically do not live in a bed of roses and if we do, someone left all the thorns in there!

CFamily

  • Guest
Christian Mindfulness
« Reply #91 on: March 31, 2016, 07:03:20 AM »
Christian Mindfulness

I didn’t have time for a crisis on that particular Thursday. I had plans: oversee my fifth grader’s holiday party, stop in at my second grader’s holiday party, pick up my little ones from preschool, coordinate a tradeoff with the babysitter, and see a full list of clients at my counseling practice.


But I had a problem. I could see only out of one corner of my right eye. A freak accident a few days before involving my three-year-old and a large toy had led to multiple visits to the eye doctor. I was scheduled for a follow-up later in the week, but when I called and described my vision the doctor told me to come in immediately. The rest of the day was a blur of confusing words and experiences: detached retina, emergency surgery, total bed rest, vision gradually returning.


Losing my vision, even temporarily, has awakened me to how much I take for granted, things like peripheral vision, depth perception, driving, and reading and writing with ease. When our world comes to a screeching halt due to an illness, loss, or traumatic event, the old adage “You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone” feels less like a cliché and more like a grave prophecy. I wish it didn’t take a crisis to make me appreciate my beautiful, albeit ordinary and messy, life.


Mindfulness


Proponents of the practice of mindfulness suggest it can awaken us to our lives without the stimulus of a catastrophic event. Mindfulness can be defined as the “intention to pay attention to each and every moment of our life, non-judgmentally,” in contrast to the mindless way many of us live, as if on autopilot. Our technologically driven, hyper-busy, multitasking, always-plugged-in culture sets us up to function on overdrive. It is a disembodied, task focused, numbed out, distracted, and distracting way of life.


Mindfulness is a skill that provides an alternative path—one that empowers us to live as embodied creatures in the present moment, aware of ourselves and one another instead of only the task at hand. Mindfulness enables us to acknowledge how we feel instead of numbing or distracting ourselves from it. I am reminded of the old Gaither song “Fully Alive”: “Open my eyes to miraculous Monday. . . . Keep me awake and alive while I’m here.” That’s the heart of mindfulness: learning to be awake and alive.


The practice of mindfulness as a psychological and physiological technique is supported by compelling research suggesting that it can lower stress, boost resilience, regulate emotions, improve the immune system, increase positive emotions, decrease inflammation in the body, and promote quicker recovery after surgery. Taking a more mindful approach toward life is beneficial to both our physical and mental health.


Source: Christian Mindfulness

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10555-christian-mindfulness
http://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/stress-reduction/faqs/
http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition
http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/07-08/ce-corner.aspx
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

Offline homebird159

Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #92 on: March 31, 2016, 01:25:01 PM »
One day at a time, sweet Jesus :)

CFamily

  • Guest
What Apple’s Encryption Fight Has to Do with Religious Freedom
« Reply #93 on: April 01, 2016, 07:11:02 AM »
What Apple’s Encryption Fight Has to Do with Religious Freedom

Why should religious freedom advocates pay attention the Apple-FBI encryption debate?


Last week, the battle between Apple and the FBI came to a temporary standstill when the FBI announced that an independent third party had offered a solution for unlocking the San Bernardino terrorist’s iPhone. But this pause doesn’t end the underlying dispute between the government and Apple, which will continue to make encrypted devices.


As an Apple spokeswoman stated on Monday, “This case raised issues which deserve a national conversation about our civil liberties, and our collective security and privacy. Apple remains committed to participating in that discussion.”


When the tech giant sought to block a federal request to access the San Bernardino terrorist’s iPhone, privacy was clearly a major issue at stake. In a court filing last month, Apple attorneys cited the First Amendment and the Fifth Amendment’s due process clause. By claiming these constitutional protections as a corporation, their defense recalled another company in the headlines for resisting government orders: Hobby Lobby.


More than half of Americans sided against Hobby Lobby before the 5-4 Supreme Court ruling that granted them a religious accommodation from a generally applicable law—a requirement that employers cover contraceptives in their health plans. Critics claimed that corporations, unlike actual persons, cannot have constitutional rights; in addition, many were distressed that the decision allowed Hobby Lobby’s owners to operate their closely held company consistent with their personal religious opposition to the morning-after pill. Supporters claimed that it was unreasonable for the government to not offer to closely held corporations the same religious accommodations that it offered to religious nonprofits that, like Hobby Lobby’s owners, affirmed that covering contraceptives they believed to be abortifacients in their employee health plan violated their sincere religious beliefs.


Despite Apple’s ubiquitous popularity and polished consumer status, public opinion remains polarized over its latest legal battle. Its claims give us another chance to consider constitutional protections for institutions.


Responding to consumer demand for privacy, Apple’s iPhones possess seemingly unbreakable encryption. According to the company’s motion to vacate, the government asked the company to write unlocking software that will work only on this particular iPhone, belonging to Syed Rizwan Farook. Apple argues that since the law treats computer code as speech, the government is attempting to violate First Amendment rights by compelling its speech. The government must show that getting Apple to create this code is “narrowly tailored to maintain a compelling state interest.” Apple claims the FBI has not submitted any evidence that the iPhone holds relevant information that the government needs.


In the Hobby Lobby case, the government faced similar burdens under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. It had to demonstrate that the contraceptive mandate was the “least restrictive means” to achieve its compelling interest. Ultimately, the court ruled that in asking Hobby Lobby to violate its sincerely held religious beliefs, the government had not chosen the least burdensome approach.


The continued media coverage of Apple’s case offers an opportunity for religious freedom advocates. Its example reminds us of the broad importance of protecting organizations—both secular and religious, for-profit and non-profit—from compulsion to act against their most foundational values. This comparison between the Apple case and the Hobby Lobby case is not exact, but the two are closer than we may realize.



Source: What Apple’s Encryption Fight Has to Do with Religious Freedom

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10560-what-apple-s-encryption-fight-has-to-do-with-religious-freedom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/03/24/fbi-we-may-not-need-apples-help-with-that-iphone-but-we-didnt-lie-about-it/
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/justice-department-withdraws-request-apple-iphone-encryption-case/story?id=37986428
http://fortune.com/2016/03/26/apple-fbi-tim-cook/
http://www.politico.com/story/2014/06/poll-hobby-lobby-most-against-limiting-coverage-108425
http://www.people-press.org/2016/02/22/more-support-for-justice-department-than-for-apple-in-dispute-over-unlocking-iphone/
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #94 on: April 01, 2016, 12:25:09 PM »
Wasn't it gaining access to one phone ?

Instead [ as far as I can see] it's been blown up as a news story about "data privacy and all out access to the general public's activity" playing on Paranoia


CFamily

  • Guest
Amplifying Evangelism—Doing Evangelism in the Workplace
« Reply #95 on: April 02, 2016, 07:11:41 AM »
Amplifying Evangelism—Doing Evangelism in the Workplace

If the average person spends at least eight hours on work five days of the week, then in the span of a year, this adds up to 2,080 hours a year in the workplace setting and community. Even if this number is half of this, that’s still a lot of time. Much ink has been spent on how Christians can share their faith in the workplace and why or why not those who follow Jesus should even try to do evangelism in the workplace.


If done properly, there is one foundational reason that all of us should be seeking ways to share our faith wherever God has placed us: we have been called to share our faith by the very God we acknowledge is Lord. I won’t go into all the scriptures that call us towards a gospel witness in both word and deed (e.g., Isa. 6:8-9, Acts 22: 14-15; Acts 4:20; Matt. 28:19). What I will say is that evangelism, when done in the proper way and the proper setting, is of utmost importance if we are to see God’s kingdom grow and more people come into a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ.


No matter the workplace, we are first and foremost working for an audience of One.

However, far too many in the church simply don’t know how to be a good gospel witness in the workplace. We either don’t know how to get faith conversations started, or we don’t know how to continue them in an appropriate manner once the door has been cracked open for us.


The key to effective evangelism in the marketplace is at the very minimum five-fold:


  1. Work with excellence. Colossians 3:23 calls us to work hard as unto the Lord. No matter the workplace, we are first and foremost working for an audience of One. And when we work in such a way, we build a foundation of witness to those around us.

  2. Have integrity. If the first point holds true, then the second must as well. Having integrity means being honest and having strong moral principles and convictions. What people see is what they get. We are salt and light in the workplace; we don’t cut corners or do sloppy work. In this way, we model after Jesus, who provided the character model we need to have as we seek effective gospel witness.

  3. Seek discernment. The Book of Proverbs is a great place to start when we consider the importance of wisdom (see Prov. 4:7 and many more). We must always first be seeking the voice of God as we navigate faith in the workplace. We must be wise in knowing the how, when, why, and who of gospel witness in the marketplace. If we don’t, we not only jeopardize our jobs, but possibly even the winsomeness of our witness.

  4. Listen to God’s voice. We must follow God’s promptings and let the Holy Spirit guide us into conversations. Without a foundation of prayer and the spiritual discipline of listening to God and His Word, we are but clanging cymbals or noisy gongs.

  5. Get going! Once we sense God calling us into deeper conversations, we must follow Him into those sometimes hard places. We must walk—sometimes run—into relationships with a commitment to take the long road if need be, to be a friend and confidant regardless of the sacrifices we might be called to make.

At the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism, one of the ways we are leading the conversation in evangelism is by resourcing Christians in the marketplace to be effective witnesses for Christ. Last September, we partnered with Q Place to launch ReKindle, a YouTube channel focused specifically on equipping and encouraging Christians to share their faith in creative and winsome ways. One of the playlists on ReKindle is Evangelism Leadership in the Workplace. As you consider what evangelism in your workplace would look like, I encourage you to watch Rich Berg’s video, Excellence in Work as a Precursor to Gospel Conversations. Rich is CEO/Co-founder of Performance Trust Capital Partners. I also encourage you to watch Phil Nussbaum’s 7 Practices for More Effective Evangelism. Phil is Chairman of the Board for The Performance Trust Companies. And on a more basic level, I invite you to watch Skye Jethani’s Recapturing a Theology of Vocation.


Check out the full list of ReKindle videos here.


What would it look like if all of us took seriously the Great Commission command even as we live and work in the marketplace? What would our workplaces look like if we implemented the five points above?



Source: Amplifying Evangelism—Doing Evangelism in the Workplace

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10562-amplifying-evangelism-mdash-doing-evangelism-in-the-workplace
http://www.lifeway.com/Article/evangelism-workplace-evangelism
http://www.gotquestions.org/workplace-faith.html
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/johnshore/2015/06/10-reasons-its-wrong-to-evangelize-in-the-workplace/
http://www.wheaton.edu/bgce/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLQx-pX_bs2d-2FAKrjznzg
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxZddGvRSn2GL7ApC4ZiO20zdyKSQfX3g
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMe0TsL17_4&index=4&list=PLxZddGvRSn2GL7ApC4ZiO20zdyKSQfX3g
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfQ1sKrcT9w&index=3&list=PLxZddGvRSn2GL7ApC4ZiO20zdyKSQfX3g
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCpCHYgLC9g&index=1&list=PLxZddGvRSn2GL7ApC4ZiO20zdyKSQfX3g
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk