Author Topic: Christian family - family and home topics  (Read 10882 times)

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Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2016, 05:48:13 PM »

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


Commenting on 'Confessions of a Controlling Wife' works both ways, what she is describing can also be male qualities. I get fed up of this sexes thing, both are responsible, both are guilty - it works both ways, as others have pointed out.

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


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Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2016, 05:58:25 PM »
Commenting on 'Why I Gave in to Barbie, Even Before Her Size Change' now  :D Sheesh, it's just a doll, a lump of plastic - oh I am so thankful I have a son - I always preferred Sindy anyways, even though I not that fussed about dolls - I still have a gothic one :wink:

I had rag dolls, maybe I should be thankful they weren't 'ultra' popular, otherwise we might have been lamenting how can a girl live up to impossible floppy limbs and the like :rolleyes:.

Even though I had a son, yes he went through the 'Telly Tubby' stage (I really wasn't a fan of such) and then the 'Power Rangers' (gosh were those violent), but that was just a pre-curser for 'Dragon Ball Z' which I failed to see much of a story line, any story line seemed to be just an excuse for violence - anyways, made me appreciate 'Pokemon' and to some lesser degree 'Digimon' no end :D. I even used to know what all the pokemon evolved into - talk about getting into your kids interests  :rolleyes:. I liked 'Team Rocket' for those in the know :). 'Double Trouble' cool song :cool:

CFamily

  • Guest
Church Planting At Thomas Road Baptist Church—An Interview with Jonathan Falwell

Ed Stetzer: Tell me about the church planting history of Thomas Roads Baptist Church as you look back at your 60 years.


Jonathan Falwell: My dad was always about church planting. He planted Thomas Road in 1956 and planted the first church out of Thomas Road just a year later. The church in Arnold’s Valley, Virginia is still thriving today.


In our close to 60 years at Thomas Road, we’ve planted 4,791 churches and we’re casting the vision for more. We want to go over 5,000 churches by the end of next year. That’s a passion that has always been part of our DNA and something we continue to work towards and pray about. We realize the way to change the world is not through elections, but through the local church.


ES: When we talk about Thomas Road, everyone thinks about Liberty University. But does the passion and focus on church planting precede the university?


JF: Absolutely. It goes back to the very genesis of our church. Recently, I read through some documents from the church in Arnold’s Valley telling how dad helped plant that church. Four months after he planted Thomas Road, in June of 1956, he began talking with a man he went to school with at Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Missouri about planting that church. They started working. They started planning. Dad began doing meetings there. He spent two weeks in that valley speaking every single night in a little chicken barn they had there. They planted that church.


Within four months, somebody donated the land and money to build a building. That building is still there on the property and they are still meeting there. When you plant churches today, after only four months most people are still trying to figure out how to find their way to the church. Dad was passionate from the beginning that we’ve got to plant more churches. We’ve got to saturate the world with the Gospel through the local church. He believed in it and we’re doing everything we can to continue that belief and continue that passion.


ES: When you say you’ve planted more than 4,000 churches at Thomas Road, what were the different ways that has happened? Were some of those people sent out? Were some of those you directly sponsored?


JF: All of the above. We have sent people out. We have funded other churches. We have trained and equipped them. We have helped to connect them with other groups. We have funded many of them all around the country. And we still continue to do that.


We’re also planting churches internationally. We’re working very diligently with groups like the Timothy Initiative and other groups where we’re planting churches in places like Sri Lanka, Nepal, Kenya, Tanzania, Burkina Faso, everywhere we can.


Dad always had the phrase, and we’ve kind of adopted it and kept a hold of it is the statement of saturation evangelism, “Reaching every available person at every available time by using every available means.” That’s what we do.


ES: People know the legacy of Thomas Road in a lot of different ways: Liberty University, cultural engagement, and even political engagement. But one of the unknown legacies is that of church planting. How is that continuing to move forward?


JF: We have the Liberty Church network, which is an organization that’s been part of Thomas Road for around 35 years. With that, we are working towards planting churches, equipping, training, assessing, connecting with NAMB and other groups to do all that we can to use every resources, every opportunity and every person that God blesses us with.


Overall, we want to make sure we are planting churches and multiplying what God has already done specifically with our church, but also throughout the history of our nation and the history of our world. We want to make sure we take it to the nth degree and continue to do that until Jesus comes back.




Source: Church Planting At Thomas Road Baptist Church—An Interview with Jonathan Falwell

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http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/9753-church-planting-at-thomas-road-baptist-church-mdash-an-interview-with-jonathan-falwell
http://namb.net/
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

CFamily

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We Don’t Age Out of Our Sexuality
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2016, 12:00:07 AM »
We Don’t Age Out of Our Sexuality

This post is part of a weekly Her.meneutics series called The Sex We Don’t Talk About, designed to feature female perspectives on aspects of sex and sexuality that can go overlooked in the church.


During the season 6 premiere of Downton Abbey, head housekeeper Mrs. Hughes confides to her friend Mrs. Patmore, the house’s cook, that she is concerned about intimacy in her impending marriage. “Look at me,” she says. “I’m a woman in late middle age.” Hughes wonders if it would be better to leave that side of their relationship dormant, living instead with her older husband-to-be as a “very loving brother and sister.”


At the episode’s end, the older couple has a tender conversation about whether their aging bodies would be desirable. The pair’s final embrace leaves no doubt that they will be living not as brother and sister but as husband and wife.


That was 1925, Since then, a whole sexual revolution has taken place. But in our contemporary discussions of sex, the topic of later-in-life sex remains an awkward afterthought.


In the tide of Christian books addressing marriage and sexuality, intimacy at midlife and beyond typically receives a cursory mention in the final chapter, if brought up at all. When evangelical pastors decided years ago to start talking (and talking) about married sex from the pulpit, the scope of many of these lessons was pretty limited: Have more sex. Have better sex. It was as if we were trying to take our cues from over-sexualized popular culture while trying to one-up it.


Local churches—like the rest of society—have kept their messaging about mature sex…well, immature. Our lessons focus on those who are married and relatively young. Singles have long felt marginalized or ignored in church conversations about sexuality. Those in the second half of life often find themselves in the same boat, relegated as either hormonal eunuchs or couples whose sexual season has long past.


When we solely address married couples in the first half of life, we are speaking to an increasingly small group. Statistics tell us that on average, American women are now 27 and men 30 at the time of their first marriage. By 2020, more than 35 percent of the population will be over 50. Plus, more than half of all adults in the country are single.


As the “senior” demographic grows in the American population and in our churches, discussions of later-in-life sexuality will be part of ongoing discipleship. Especially in contrast to culture’s prescription to stay “sexy at 70” and stave off the effects of aging with drugs that promise to keep us young (and virile), our communities can serve their members well by making spaces where we can speak in frank, God-honoring ways about the challenges of growing older. Topics like:



Source: We Don’t Age Out of Our Sexuality

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http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/9756-we-don-t-age-out-of-our-sexuality
http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2016/january/why-christian-women-need-to-talk-about-sex.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/24/us/24sex.html?_r=0
http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2013/april/im-sick-of-hearing-about-your-smoking-hot-wife.html
http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/03/getting-married-later-is-great-for-college-educated-women/274040/
http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu/employers/popualation/Pages/default.aspx
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/single-youre-not-alone/
http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2015/june/sex-drugs-and-getting-old.html
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2016, 12:05:33 AM »
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Commenting on 'Confessions of a Controlling Wife' works both ways, what she is describing can also be male qualities. I get fed up of this sexes thing, both are responsible, both are guilty - it works both ways, as others have pointed out. - See more at: http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/christian-family/msg54225/?topicseen#msg54225


I agree
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/christian-family/msg54225/?topicseen#msg54225

CFamily

  • Guest
To Hope All Things About the American Voter
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2016, 12:00:10 AM »
To Hope All Things About the American Voter

I heard a story recently about a fairly well-known evangelical figure who was confronted about public statements he had made in writing and interviews. A fellow believer met and reasoned with him for several hours, explaining that he believed the leader had deceived his audience. When the facts became overwhelming, this influential evangelical conceded that he had been playing fast and loose with facts. However, since his overall message was true and important, he reasoned, it was justifiable to fudge the details in order to motivate voters to make the right decision.


You’re wondering who this evangelical leader is, but in a sense it doesn’t matter, because he could be just about anybody. The belief that American voters must be manipulated rather than reasoned with if we want to institute any meaningful change is endemic. But this belief is essentially nihilist because it makes all political discourse a matter of coercion, a matter of who is doing the coercing and to what ends. I call this nihilist because it makes power, not truth, goodness, or beauty, the foundation of politics.


Followers of Christ are called to “hope all things.” According to Paul, this is one of the defining features of love. If this is true, then for Christians, there is no room for nihilist politics. We are obligated to treat our neighbors as people who deserve honest appeals. This does not mean that all political discourse must be highly rational. There is a place for appeals to emotion, as well as to beauty. Don’t think I am denouncing all political ads that appeal to our emotions. While I do think that our politics could do with a great deal more logic and reason, I reject the idea that only what is rational is relevant to political discourse.

No, my objection is to appeals that are dishonest, and dishonesty can be cloaked in “reason” or “emotion” or “patriotism.” The most common and insidious form that this takes is the example I began with: when we lie about particulars in order to justify a general truth. I call this insidious because it occurs so subtly and is so easy for us to personally justify.


A recent high-profile example of apparent deception for a greater good came from presidential candidate Ted Cruz. According to some accounts, the senator used publically available voting data to shame neighbors into participating in the Iowa caucus. The Cruz campaign sent official-looking letters that urged Iowa residents to vote and gave them and their neighbors a letter grade for past voting. According to the New Yorker, these “grades” were made up and did not reflect residents’ actual voting history. This tactic received significant backlash from voters and Iowa state leaders alike. They felt it was coercive to use shame to get people to vote and deceptive for the Cruz campaign to assign letter grades to voting records, as if the grades were an official part of that record.


Cruz isn’t the first candidate to use this strategy. In 2012, President Obama’s reelection campaign used a similar strategy. The MoveOn campaign mailed out 12 million letters that used “social pressure” to drive voters to the polls. Apparently across the aisle, politicians believe that manipulative, deceptive practices are sometimes necessary to win bigger, more important battles.


But it’s not just political elites who fall into nihilism, where truth is subservient to the power to persuade. Our public conversations about news events and politics often fall into this, too. Let’s say I share a sensational news report about something that Sarah Palin recently said. I add some commentary to the post about how the quotation represents how ignorant Palin is, and several of my friends join in the mockery. Then another friend points out that she never actually made that statement. Embarrassed and anxious to save face, I reply, “Sure, this quotation is fake, but she says stuff like this all the time. The point is, she’s ignorant.”



Source: To Hope All Things About the American Voter

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http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/9754-to-hope-all-things-about-the-american-voter
http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/ted-cruzs-iowa-mailers-are-more-fraudulent-than-everyone-thinks
http://www.slate.com/blogs/victory_lab/2012/10/31/moveon_can_its_voter_report_card_shame_slackers_into_turning_out.html
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

CFamily

  • Guest
Weekend Edition: February 5, 2016
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2016, 12:00:11 AM »
Weekend Edition: February 5, 2016

POLITICS IS NEVER ENOUGHAaron Earls


Aaron Earls is a consistently solid writer, and this post on how Christians engage politics is no exception.



Solo But Not AloneErin Straza


Living single in a mostly married world is always a challenge.



The Church's One Foundation—Rebecca Faires


The writers at She Reads Truth are blogging themes from the theology in older hymns.



4 Lies About LoveTony Merida


All we need is love? Not so fast.



Five Common Reasons Church Members Burnout​Thom Rainer


Church member burnout continues to happen all too frequently.



Want to read a weekly digest of The Exchange blog? Click here to subscribe to Christianity Today's Newsletter for The Exchange to get weekly wrap-ups in your inbox.


Download this week's edition of The Exchange Podcast with Greg Surratt.


Earlier this Week at The Exchange


Church Planting At Thomas Road Baptist Church—An Interview with Jonathan Falwell​


Viewing Black Lives Matter, Part 1​


The Gettys Spearhead Call For a Global Hymn Sing


Exploring Evangelicalism: An Interview With Brian Brodersen of Calvary Chapel—Part 1


Exploring Evangelicalism: An Interview With Brian Brodersen of Calvary Chapel—Part 2


Trend #1 For The Future Of Church Planting—Kingdom Collaboration


Sunday Journeys: Millcreek Community Church in Erie, PA, a Visit to a Church We Planted 20 Years Ago


Religion in America: An Interview With Greg Smith of the Pew Research Center (Part 2)


Church Signs


Makes me wonder when the typocrites go to church.




And everyone who knows a saved curmudgeon said, "Amen!"




They've peppered their sign with veggies. Kinda corny if you ask me.




Thanks to Brad Johnson, Josh Hearrin, and Mark Ellison for this week's signs. As always, you can tweet your church sign pics to @EdStetzer.



Source: Weekend Edition: February 5, 2016

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http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/9771-weekend-edition-february-5-2016
http://thewardrobedoor.com/2016/02/politics-is-never-enough.html
http://twitter.com/wardrobedoor
http://christandpopculture.com/author/estraza/
https://twitter.com/ErinStraza
http://shereadstruth.com/2016/02/02/the-churchs-one-foundation/

CFamily

  • Guest
Why Are You So Hard on Yourself?
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2016, 12:00:15 AM »
Why Are You So Hard on Yourself?

Why Are You So Hard on Yourself?

ALTANAKA / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM




As a manager, I can usually tell when my employees have a problem with self-doubt because I see them pulling back when they should be pushing forward. They don’t raise their hands when I ask for someone to take the lead. They don’t apply for promotions, even though they might be qualified. They don’t challenge the assumptions or misstatements of others, even when they should. The irony for many managers is that these self-sabotaging employees often possess tremendous potential, apparent to everyone but themselves.


When people doubt themselves, they tend to project that doubt onto others. That perceived lack of confidence leads others to assume that they can’t handle hard assignments or won’t achieve desired results.


Evidence and personal experience suggest that pervasive self-doubt especially plagues women. From workplace choices to parenting decisions, men tend to, if anything, overestimate their competence while women consistently underestimate theirs. Some consider it a “confidence gap” between men and women. Others have talked about “imposter syndrome,” where people routinely assume that they don’t deserve to be where they are, and they fear exposure. One author I recently heard interviewed described the problem in terms of an overactive or unchecked inner critic. The author, Tara Mohr, describes the inner critic as an extreme, repetitive, pessimistic voice of doubt and fear.


“You’ll Never Fit in Here”


I think of myself as self-assured, but as Mohr explained her conception of an inner critic’s voice, it resonated with me. In 2008 I had just accepted a dream job as COO of a global real estate company. I spent most of my career working for just one company, and it was a place where I felt comfortable and capable. This job came with big challenges, different working styles, and new corporate values. I felt that my skills and experiences were up to the task, on paper, but I was haunted by a nagging voice of doubt nevertheless: You’ll never fit in here. They don’t respect your values. They don’t empower their people. This can’t work.


I didn’t have a name for it then, but today I would call that voice my inner critic. Ultimately, the job didn’t work out for me. I don’t think the situation would have ended differently if I hadn’t had that nagging inner critic, yet I can see the toll those negative messages took in terms of energy, joy, and stress.





Source: Why Are You So Hard on Yourself?

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/9806-why-are-you-so-hard-on-yourself
http://www.todayschristianwoman.com/images/67340.jpg?w=620
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/05/the-confidence-gap/359815/
http://paulineroseclance.com/impostor_phenomenon.html
http://hbr.org/ideacast/2016/01/make-peace-with-your-inner-critic
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk