Author Topic: Christian family - family and home topics  (Read 10884 times)

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TJ

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Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #64 on: March 17, 2016, 01:22:26 PM »

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


Saw this post and suddenly had a picture of a mad farmer rampaiging through a field

HAHAAAAAAAAA  ho ho ho ho hehehehheheeee  aye heheeeeeeeeeeee   loopy:

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk


CFamily

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The Gender Conversation We Aren’t Having
« Reply #65 on: March 18, 2016, 01:10:07 AM »
The Gender Conversation We Aren’t Having

It seems there are two rival gangs in the evangelical world: complementarians, who believe that men assume primary leadership in the church and in the home, versus egalitarians, who believe women can share leadership in these realms. Denominations, parachurch organizations, seminaries, advocacy groups, even Christian websites segregate along these lines and can use them as a false litmus test for orthodoxy.


But lately, I find myself frustrated that these terms (which are often left slippery and undefined) obscure as much as they reveal. I want to look at each realm—home and church—to see how these terms can fail us and examine what is lost when these gender role labels dominate our conversation.


First, marriage. Though views of women’s roles can seem straightforward in an abstract theological argument, in the intimate, ordinary crucible of marriage, things are never so tidy. My own marriage began as one that may be described as “soft complementarian”—my husband and I professed a vague notion of male “headship.” Over time, through studying Scripture and tradition, our position changed. We came to see patriarchy as a consequence of the fall and the restoration of parity between men and women as part of the reconciliation offered in the gospel. At this point, if you pressed us, we’d define our relationship as “egalitarian.”


But despite the shift in terminology, if I’m honest, there's basically no difference in my day-to-day married life. We were sinners trying to love each other and submit to each other back when we were complementarians, and we are sinners trying to love each other and submit to each other now. Our views on gender roles never shortcut the difficult, sacred work of dying to ourselves for the sake of loving another, which is the call for men and women alike in any Christian marriage. If the goal of Christian marriage is, as Paul states, to “submit to one another out of reverence for Christ,” it isn’t clear how these labels help us.


Secondly, the church. While complementarian/egalitarian labels can be helpful when discussing women’s ordination, in the pragmatic realities of ministry, these labels aren’t clear-cut either. I am a female priest, so my church may rightly be called “egalitarian.” Still, according to some—like Anglican priest John Stott, for instance—my ordination fits in a complementarian view since I serve under the authority of a male bishop. Other complementarians see female pastorship or priesthood of any sort as impermissible. But the categories become more complex and blurry if we ask about women teaching adult Sunday School, leading worship, writing books, preaching at conferences, speaking at church gatherings, or heading parachurch groups.



Source: The Gender Conversation We Aren’t Having

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10354-the-gender-conversation-we-aren-t-having
http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2015/april/finding-my-place-in-gospel-coalition.html
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #66 on: March 18, 2016, 01:23:38 AM »
Totally agree with this

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #67 on: March 18, 2016, 01:30:23 AM »
The Gender Conversation We Aren’t Having

<div id=&#039;article_intro_ag&#039;><p>It seems there are two rival gangs in the evangelical world: complementarians, who believe that men assume primary leadership in the church and in the home, versus egalitarians, who believe women can share leadership in these realms. Denominations, parachurch organizations, seminaries, advocacy groups, even Christian websites segregate along these lines and can use them as a false litmus test for orthodoxy.</p>
<p>But lately, I find myself frustrated that these terms (which are often left slippery and undefined) obscure as much as they reveal. I want to look at each realm&mdash;home and church&mdash;to see how these terms can fail us and examine what is lost when these gender role labels dominate our conversation.</p>
<p>First, marriage. Though views of women&rsquo;s roles can seem straightforward in an abstract theological argument, in the intimate, ordinary crucible of marriage, things are never so tidy. My own marriage began as one that may be described as &ldquo;soft complementarian&rdquo;&mdash;my husband and I professed a vague notion of male &ldquo;headship.&rdquo; Over time, through studying Scripture and tradition, our position changed. We came to see patriarchy as a consequence of the fall and the restoration of parity between men and women as part of the reconciliation offered in the gospel. At this point, if you pressed us, we&rsquo;d define our relationship as &ldquo;egalitarian.&rdquo;</p>
<p>But despite the shift in terminology, if I&rsquo;m honest, there&#039;s basically no difference in my day-to-day married life. We were sinners trying to love each other and submit to each other back when we were complementarians, and we are sinners trying to love each other and submit to each other now. Our views on gender roles never shortcut the difficult, sacred work of dying to ourselves for the sake of loving another, which is the call for men and women alike in any Christian marriage. If the goal of Christian marriage is, as Paul states, to &ldquo;submit to one another out of reverence for Christ,&rdquo; it isn&rsquo;t clear how these labels help us.</p>
<p>Secondly, the church. While complementarian/egalitarian labels can be helpful when discussing women&rsquo;s ordination, in the pragmatic realities of ministry, these labels aren&rsquo;t clear-cut either. I am a female priest, so my church may rightly be called &ldquo;egalitarian.&rdquo; Still, according to some&mdash;like Anglican priest John Stott, for instance&mdash;my ordination fits in a complementarian view since I serve under the authority of a male bishop. Other complementarians see female pastorship or priesthood of any sort as impermissible. But the categories become more complex and blurry if we ask about women teaching adult Sunday School, leading worship, writing books, preaching at <a target="_blank" rel="nofollow" href="http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2015/april/finding-my-place-in-gospel-coalition.html">conferences[/url], speaking at church gatherings, or heading parachurch groups.</p>
<span id="133866"></span></div>

Source: The Gender Conversation We Aren’t Having

C-Family - C-More









This is a silly argument -based on man rules

As if Jesus is crucified Now

Church - man - women -  children....

This was the norn in Jewish society when Jesus appeared in our world as  flesh

But what if Jesus appears now in our lifes >?


Does it mean that Jewiah society now applies to 2016 >?


I would suggest no...


Is the written word bound by time ?

It seems not when we llook at John 1:1





http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10354-the-gender-conversation-we-aren-t-having
http://www.christianitytoday.com/women/2015/april/finding-my-place-in-gospel-coalition.html
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

Offline homebird159

Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #68 on: March 18, 2016, 02:07:39 AM »
Sorry?  What do you mean by that?

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #69 on: March 18, 2016, 12:28:25 PM »
Ahh it's me ranting    :D 

CFamily

  • Guest
Are Unrealistic Expectations Hurting Your Kids?
« Reply #70 on: March 19, 2016, 01:14:00 AM »
Are Unrealistic Expectations Hurting Your Kids?

Are Unrealistic Expectations Hurting Your Kids?

UBER IMAGES / SHUTTERSTOCK




If I’m being downright honest,” she shared through tears, “sometimes I parent out of embarrassment. Sometimes my correction comes from what others think about my child rather than something that’s between me and my child.” My young friend stood in the hallway at church, sobbing.


“I understand,” I responded with a hug. “I’ve been there way too many times.”


Perfection. It’s all around us. We see images of perfect bodies, perfect families, and perfect houses on the covers of magazines at the grocery store. Scrolling through Facebook, we unfavorably compare our family’s insides to other families’ outsides. It’s no wonder we too often have unrealistic expectations of ourselves.


Without much effort, the dreaded illness of perfection infection can slip into our parenting. When it does, we develop unrealistic expectations for our kids as we compare them to their siblings or a friend’s children. Add the church environment into this mix—where all want their children to be on their best behavior—and we’re set up for the nightmare of perfection parenting.


Perfection infection happens when we react to our kids’ surroundings rather than lead them according to their own needs. It’s when we discipline or motivate or shape their behavior based on the mistaken belief that they must meet other people’s standards rather than our own—or God’s. It’s when we nitpick even minor errors, leading our kids to believe they have to be flawless and never make mistakes in order to meet our approval. God doesn’t expect perfection from us, so why do we expect it from our kids?


I remember when our children were learning to walk. It was two steps and a fall, then three steps and a fall. We never called that failure. Their steps and falls marked progress. We cheered them on because they were moving toward walking.


Why then, when children get older, do our expectations change? Why do we start thinking of the “falls” as mistakes, failures, or imperfections? Why are we unable to see them as progress? It’s because our thinking has been infected by the notion that perfect is the only acceptable standard for our kids—and we don’t even realize it.


Dangers of Perfection Parenting


Parenting for perfection is costly; the damage to our children can be profound. Whether we are explicit about our expectations or not, children will pick up on them. It doesn’t matter what we say we want from them. If the “perfect” bug has infected our parenting style, our children will react to it negatively. Here are some of the dangers that can develop if we continue in that direction.





Source: Are Unrealistic Expectations Hurting Your Kids?

C-Family - C-More








http://www.faithwall.co.uk/index.php/15-christian-family/10371-are-unrealistic-expectations-hurting-your-kids
http://www.todayschristianwoman.com/images/68100.jpg?w=620
http://www.1faith.co.uk/family-home-forum/?action=post

TJ

  • Guest
Re: Christian family - family and home topics
« Reply #71 on: March 19, 2016, 01:27:45 AM »
Well yes that is one aspect of parenting.

On the other hand the young adult can rebel against good parenting.

It really depend which age group you are talking about here

C-Family @ Faithwall

C-FAMILY ~ C MORE @ Faithwall.co.uk