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Offline melliff

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Denominations
« on: February 18, 2021, 05:36:53 PM »

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I was brought up in the Anglican Church.  For many years I believed that the teachings of that church and its practices reflected God's word.  I was shocked when I discovered that there are many denominations that claim to be of the Christian faith, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Anabaptists, Evangelicals, Lutherans, Methodists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormans, 7th Day Adventists, to name but a tiny few, whose teachings and practices are dramatically different from those of the Anglican Church and from each other.

My question is, are all these denominations compatible with the Christian faith?  They are clearly interpreting God's word in very different ways, so how is one to know what is the truth?

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Offline Deborah

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2021, 05:50:29 PM »
Most of them are expressions of true Christianity (exceptions are generally considered to be Jehovahs Witnesses and Mormons).

As an Anglican, you should be aware that differences in belief between different Anglican churches are often greater than between Anglicans and other denominations!

There are many issues on which it's perfectly allowable for Christians to hold different opinions (see Romans 14 for a few examples).

Many Christians (such as myself) belong to churches of various denominations over the course of our lives. The first church I joined after becoming a Christian was Baptist, but I've also been involved with New Frontiers and Anglican churches. Now I'm back in a Baptist church again.

Remember what Jesus said: "Whoever is not against you is for you." (Luke 9:50) There's diversity of Christian practice, but most churches and Christians of different denominations work happily together.
"Resist the devil, standing firm in the faith." (I Peter 5:9)

Earthman

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2021, 12:36:13 AM »
Quote
I was brought up in the Anglican Church.  For many years I believed that the teachings of that church and its practices reflected God's word.  I was shocked when I discovered that there are many denominations that claim to be of the Christian faith, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Anabaptists, Evangelicals, Lutherans, Methodists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormans, 7th Day Adventists, to name but a tiny few, whose teachings and practices are dramatically different from those of the Anglican Church and from each other.

My question is, are all these denominations compatible with the Christian faith?  They are clearly interpreting God's word in very different ways, so how is one to know what is the truth?

Well I was broiught in a non believers family , my dad being an athiest..

The question is about different denominations, but you can also have differing  interpretations within denominations..

Another thing I noticed [coming in from the outside]  was the "reason why people were actualling attending"..and looking at thier hearts..

My first Church/ denomination/ was a free Church "I went their because the people who drew me to God  were the leaders  - .ATT.

The second building had a label over it  saying "free Church", but actually I think it was an old brethren Church building..

Course coming in from the outside , presented me with  a few problens, your not just talking about interpretation here,

Your talking about class / lower - middle and high class [not should ever be a problen in the Building or in relationships]

I noticed cliques and groups - I could not break into - I noticed all kinds of things going on that I did not agree with .

That was when I began my own interdenominational studies and prayer nights and we finished each month with a barbecue..

I aligned myself along many who were like me .. these people came from Baptist - COF - Free Churches - but I never managed to get further than that before I was - taken by a female.

I then went on to a baptist Church  building were I met my wife..

After that Church was sold off to make way for flats - "the now "we"went to a sister Baptist Church and after leaderhip problems - we went onto yet another baptist Building..

[TBO - I think we feel safer here / without all the problems of leadership.

We have kind of gone for the less troublesome ..



In summing up - no doesn't matter what building you go to [although I would avoid places that might lead you into the wrong things, such as
 spiritualist churches or the mormon belief etc..

Having said that, there's no reason why you cannot befriend a person who has been misled.



It's all about the heart and I do not mean superficial intent, people can seem to be very nice but - but then turn..




Put it this way "your gran has a good heart and you know that - so  you put up with all her opinions on the bible and people"

You knew or know - that she all after God's heart - but kind of lost the way over the years [due to her old age] etc.. [as she went to the old school]

She has a strong relationship with God.. would it really matter what Church she went too or what denom ?

I would be more concerned about those around her - that is why we all join those we like [on facebook] we all join together where we feel safe.

Not so much a belief system ..



I was taken back by a Christian group [who broke through all the barriers] they went to nightclubs to talk about Christ to younger people.. wow that blew me away..

The reason I came to Chirst was because a family was willing to give up everything to have me ..

I would be quite willing to go to any Denom- just to come alonside someone [BUT - [It must be a work of God and you must be called to it]

It is a dangerous thing to do anything without God's permission.

So we allow certain people into our realm, not because we agree with them - but because we know them.

God allowed the woman at the well to meet Jesus - because that was permitted  by God - totally agaisnt religious believe..ATT. and the Denoms of that age..



The label "Christian" is another one to look for - within the denomination that you are in [this is the more hazardous label..]

You can have sheep among wolves, you won't know that untl you enter into a deeper relationship - so beware..











Offline eik

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2021, 09:02:52 AM »
I was brought up in the Anglican Church.  For many years I believed that the teachings of that church and its practices reflected God's word.  I was shocked when I discovered that there are many denominations that claim to be of the Christian faith, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Anabaptists, Evangelicals, Lutherans, Methodists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormans, 7th Day Adventists, to name but a tiny few, whose teachings and practices are dramatically different from those of the Anglican Church and from each other.

My question is, are all these denominations compatible with the Christian faith?  They are clearly interpreting God's word in very different ways, so how is one to know what is the truth?
The problem is really with the whole concept of a "denomination." The early church knew nothing of "Christian" churches / denominations that wouldn't fellowship, wouldn't speak to each other. In those days a church not in fellowship was a heretical church by definition. To set up a denomination or treat other churches as other than your own denomination was to implicitly declare other churches as heretical. There was only one denomination, the orthodox church with a small 'o'.

Divisiveness arose as was predicted by Paul the apostle. Men sought to draw away others into their own perverse doctrines, such as mariolatry, worship of the virgin, and Greek trinitarian philosophy.

Politics caused divisions and persecution began. God the son replaced the son of God. One church sought to impose its unique philosophy or politics on another. Prelates began to anathematize each other. This went on for hundreds of years since the second century and is still going on. Different churches couldn't agree on which was supreme, or whose doctrine or philosophy was correct. Geographical denominations formed just because the leaders fell out with each other over doctrine and supremacy. Frequently the cause of falling out was philosophical speculation over such abstruse subjects as the "substance of God" (homoousia) which isn't even in the bible.

Anglicanism began in the 16th century and was always going to result in free churches loosely defined (i.e. separated from the State church) because the State cannot be seen to control a church or its doctrine. In the last 150 years, alignment of Anglicanism with an increasingly liberal and hedonistic State has had very detrimental consequences in the introduction of heretical doctrines. It is a shame because of the scholarship of its earlier adherents in bygone days, where it retained credible theologicans who actually believed the gospel. Yet always there was much to criticize with the whole Anglican church model, and its re-emergence in the wholesale persecution & repression of presbyterians in the reign of Charles II augured ill for its long term viability.

As for the New Testament, the bible knows only of one denomination, the "Church of God." It is found frequently referenced in the letters of Paul.

The criteria for christian legitimacy then is, "Is the denomination / church really a "church of God?""

Many denominations / churches today do not fall into the "church of God" denomination. Denominations are sometimes unified in doctrine, and sometimes not.  Within any denomination, it may be that individual churches are disqualified, and others qualified. You'd be surprised at the reasons for disqualification: in 1 Co 11:16 the "churches of God" are to be discerned as those churches that make women's head coverings mandatory. In this day, the "churches of God" are a small proportion of all the churches of the occident (limited to free presbyterian, a few baptist, brethren, a few catholic, a few pentecostal etc).

Other heresies, in addition to women usurping God's laws relating to the appointed order within the priesthood, abound: Tit 3:10 "Warn a divisive person once, and then warn them a second time. After that, have nothing to do with them."

In practice all churches which elect heretical leaders or which tolerate unrepentant sin can be disqualified from recognition as "churches of God." It would include the well known sects,  but increasingly mainstream denominations, seen either as failing to condemn Islam as anathema to Christianity, or else "derecognizing" serious sin from an imaginary need to curry political favour whence it becomes a church of Ba'al, not God.

May be today one has to conceive of oneself as a missionary to many so-termed churches, so far from the truth are so many. The days of expecting to find a regular New Testament defined "church of God" on one's doorstep are long gone.




Offline davetaff

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2021, 01:47:42 PM »
I was brought up in the Anglican Church.  For many years I believed that the teachings of that church and its practices reflected God's word.  I was shocked when I discovered that there are many denominations that claim to be of the Christian faith, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Anabaptists, Evangelicals, Lutherans, Methodists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormans, 7th Day Adventists, to name but a tiny few, whose teachings and practices are dramatically different from those of the Anglican Church and from each other.

My question is, are all these denominations compatible with the Christian faith?  They are clearly interpreting God's word in very different ways, so how is one to know what is the truth?

Hi melliff
Thank you for your question the only advice I can give you is to check everything that different denominations say is to check it against what the scripture say against what they say if what they say contradicts scripture then you can disregard what they say.
A couple of examples the three wise men the word three does not appear in scripture Mary riding on a donkey does not appear in scripture the RC say that Mary was a perpetual virgin all her life even after giving birth to several children not supported in scripture and finally the trinity the word or teaching is not found in scripture there are probably more like I say check everything against scripture we know Gods words are true and we need to get back to what God says not man.

Love and Peace
Dave

Earthman

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2021, 12:42:12 AM »
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the orthodox church


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denominations that wouldn't fellowship, wouldn't speak to each other.

Quote
God the son replaced the son of God. One church


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Other heresies, in addition to women usurping God's laws

Quote
Many denominations / churches today do not fall into the "church of God" denomination.

Quote
The criteria for christian legitimacy then is, "Is the denomination / church really a "church of God?""

What on earth are you talking about ?


O dear ....


Offline eik

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2021, 02:50:12 AM »



What on earth are you talking about ?


O dear ....
But you claim to be so enlightened? If you knew the bible and church history, you would know.

Let's take just one. "God the Son" is not found in the bible, nor is the concept of eternal generation with which it is associated. It made its way into "Christian theology" directly from pagan philosophy, where the concept had already been well established by the Greeks, in their pagan religion which cast God the Son as eternally generated in heaven. Christians then pretended that "begotten" really meant that the Son was "eternally generated." From thence came Arianism, which cast Christ as less than God.

These observations mean Christ still comes from God. Christ is still the word of God. I am not advocating Arianism like the JWs. Quite the reverse. I emphasize a far stronger claim to divinity for Christ as he was not "eternally generated" but always existent with the Father. Begotten simply means "naturally born as a human" in my vocabulary.

I am pointing out that so many divisions arose in the early church just because of the introduction of pagan philosophies by the early church fathers, and which derived originally from Egypt. Foremost of which was the syncretism of Christianity with prevalent Greek philosophy. For Christianity grew up alongside paganism with which it became enmeshed. It didn't grow up in a religious vacuum. Indeed the church fathers strove to present Christianity as acceptable to the Greeks, and in that sense diluted its unique doctrines.


Earthman

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Re: Denominations
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2021, 01:58:49 PM »
ok thanks .

Just got confused there with
Quote
God the son replaced the son of God. One church

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