Author Topic: Psalms 1-41  (Read 2027 times)

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Offline John

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2019, 06:53:26 PM »
Dave the context of the psalm is one of worship and praise of the magnificence of our God.
There is nothing in the psalm to imply that it referrs to Jesus and a lot that says that 'man' is humanity.

Adam was given dominion over the animals, birds, and beasts of the field. In comparassion Jesus has dominion over ALL creation.

Offline Deborah

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2019, 10:02:10 PM »
Dave the context of the psalm is one of worship and praise of the magnificence of our God.
There is nothing in the psalm to imply that it referrs to Jesus and a lot that says that 'man' is humanity.

Adam was given dominion over the animals, birds, and beasts of the field. In comparassion Jesus has dominion over ALL creation.

You are correct that, as originally written, the psalm is talking about the human race.

But for once, Dave is also on the right track. See Hebrews 2:5-9, where the writer says that the incompleteness of our dominion points to its greater fulfilment in Jesus.

We were meant to be kings ? but something, somewhere, went wrong, and we have failed to achieve our intended destiny. Under God?s authority, we were meant to maintain and control the natural world, restraining its wilder tendencies and ruling it with firm benevolence as His deputies. But we rebelled...

As a result, everything went awry (Genesis 3:17-19). We were meant to be careful stewards of the beautiful planet God gave us; but we have greedily exploited its resources and exterminated many of its other inhabitants. Human society was meant to reflect the glory and diversity of God Himself; but instead it is characterised mainly by rivalry and prejudice. We were meant to be the masters of the universe; but in truth we cannot even control ourselves (see James 3:7,8).

So although God gave the human race the right to rule the earth (and He has not taken it away from us), our authority is incomplete. Despite much scientific progress during the last two centuries, human beings are still at the mercy of disease and disaster - and we are still all, ultimately, defeated by death. "At present we do not see everything subject to them. But we do see Jesus..." (Hebrews 2:8,9)

The only exception is Jesus. He is the perfect representative of humanity, the 'second Adam', who has restored God's original intention for mankind and set it back on track. During His ministry, He demonstrated absolute control over all the forces of nature (including sickness and death). He is the Man who has been "crowned with glory and honour" (Psalm 8:5), who in submitting voluntarily to death overcame it (I Corinthians 15:26,27), and who is now supreme over all things (Ephesians 1:22), He is the ultimate hope of the human race, the Ruler of all.
"Blessed is the one who always trembles before God,
but whoever hardens their heart falls into trouble." (Proverbs 28:14)

Offline davetaff

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2019, 02:14:19 PM »
Dave the context of the psalm is one of worship and praise of the magnificence of our God.
There is nothing in the psalm to imply that it referrs to Jesus and a lot that says that 'man' is humanity.

Adam was given dominion over the animals, birds, and beasts of the field. In comparassion Jesus has dominion over ALL creation.

Hi John
As for me I look for Christ in all of scripture from Genesis to Revelations as you say Christ has dominion over all creation so would  God limit our knowledge of him to a few bits and pieces here and there.
If you wish to discuss this further please start a new thread I now hand over to Deborah to continue with this wonderful psalm.

Love and Peace
Dave 

Offline Deborah

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2019, 03:10:04 PM »
Psalm 14

"The fool says in his heart,
'There is no God.'"
(verse 1)

The label 'atheist' is borne proudly by people such as Richard Dawkins and the late Christopher Hitchens. Yet there are many more individuals who, though they would not actually go so far as to call themselves atheists (they might even call themselves 'Christian'!), are nevertheless quietly determined that God shall have no authority over their lives. This is 'practical atheism', and it is all around us.

The attraction of this point of view is obvious: it sets you free from any form of external moral authority. In effect, you yourself are the final arbiter of all the moral decisions you make. There is nobody out there telling you what to do; it is 'every man for himself'. Religious people can be conveniently dismissed as 'backward' or 'childish' - believers in fairy stories and the like.

This is the modern version of 'wisdom', embraced by many intelligent and highly educated people (such as Dawkins and Hitchens) - but "the wisdom of the world is foolishness in God's sight." (I Corinthians 3:19) The very God whose existence they deny sees it all, and shakes His head in sorrow. 'Foolishness' in the Biblical sense is not stupidity, but a determination to 'do it my way' - which is, alas, the path to self-destruction (Proverbs 14:12). This is actually nothing to do with good behaviour (or the lack of it); it is the direction your life is heading. It doesn't matter how beautifully clean and seaworthy your ship is, if you insist on steering it towards the rocks. And it doesn't matter how sure you are that the chart is wrong (or that the rocks don't even exist); you will sink just the same when you eventually hit them.

This is the 'folly' of atheism: to turn one's back on the only safe harbour and head out to sea alone.
"Blessed is the one who always trembles before God,
but whoever hardens their heart falls into trouble." (Proverbs 28:14)

Offline davetaff

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2019, 12:45:53 PM »
Hi Deborah
Thank you for your post very good and I  can agree with you 100%.
There is another aspect to this it is the attitude of the governments and dictatorships and the like who in effect say there is no God and rule accordingly they do so much harm.
It is a world wide problem and they are influencing so many but our Lord has warned us about the end times so we should be on our guard against there authority and the changing of God's laws.
But we who believe know that all things will come to pass according to the will of God so we are not fools.

Love and Peace
Dave

Offline Deborah

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2019, 09:57:36 AM »
Psalm 15

"LORD, who may dwell in Your sacred tent?
Who may live on Your holy mountain?"
(verse 1)

The matter under consideration here is not how we can approach God in the first place (because He rejects no-one) but what sort of person can enjoy fellowship with a holy and righteous God and remain in His presence. The requirements are not ritual, but moral: only someone who reflects the character of God in his daily life can truly claim to belong to and with Him.

When this psalm was written, it referred to a physical sanctuary, the Tabernacle; but the same question can be asked today, of those who claim to be members of the Church. "For of this you can be sure: no immoral, impure or greedy person - such a person is an idolater - has any inheritance in the Kingdom of Christ and of God." (Ephesians 5:5)

The 'saint' described here is no superman, but an ordinary person. What sets him apart from his contemporaries are the very basic virtues of honesty, integrity, and generosity. He has no guilty secrets or hidden embarrassments, and in every area of life he does what is right, rather than what is expedient.

Perhaps surprisingly, the psalm ends on a confident note. It lays out high standards, not to condemn us for our inevitable lapses, but to encourage those who are genuinely striving to put their faith into practice. "For if you do these things you will never stumble, and you will receive a rich welcome into the eternal Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ." (II Peter 1:10,11) We are not temporary guests in God's house; it will be our permanent home.
"Blessed is the one who always trembles before God,
but whoever hardens their heart falls into trouble." (Proverbs 28:14)

Offline davetaff

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2019, 04:02:03 PM »
Hi Deborah
Thank you for your post its great to see you posting again you have been missed.

Reading this psalm has reminded me of our Lord when he returns he will be on that holy mountain with all those who are his body he is the sinless man the psalm shows us this how someone who is in Christ should live there lives as he did so let us follow his example and reside in the sacred tent on the holy mountain.
Was wondering is the body of Christ our sacred tent to reside in.

Love and Peace
Dave

Offline Deborah

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Re: Psalms 1-41
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2020, 09:23:35 PM »
Psalm 16:1-6

One of life's most important decisions is which philosophy to live by. This will have far-reaching consequences (not all of them foreseeable). David has made his own choice of which god to serve:
"I say to the LORD, 'You are my Lord.'" (verse 2) And he commits himself to God's care and protection (verse 1). He relies on God alone for security, and looks nowhere else for happiness. And because he loves God, he has a close affinity with others who have a similar love for God (verse 3). In the same way, Christians share a bond with all other Christians (whatever their ethnicity or denominational affiliation).

What alternatives are there? Man-made religions demand much effort and give little reward. Yet idolatry is the 'default option' of the world, and it exerts an almost irresistible pull on us. Hence the repeated warnings against it in both Old and New Testaments (e.g. Joshua 23:7,8; I Corinthians 10:14). Conversion is not just a once-in-a-lifetime event; it has to be consciously and consistently worked out in our daily lives as we maintain our allegiance to the living God.

Such loyalty is not without cost - but it also has its reward. "Do not be afraid, little flock, for your Father has been pleased to give you the Kingdom." (Luke 12:32) David has found a greater satisfaction in his God than in the uncertainties of this world (verses 5,6). The person who has God possesses everything they need; they do not need to seek security in material things. Our wealth is unseen, but not unreal; it is intangible, but not insecure. "Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In His great mercy He has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade." (I Peter 1:3,4)
"Blessed is the one who always trembles before God,
but whoever hardens their heart falls into trouble." (Proverbs 28:14)

 

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